Meet Karen Pivnick

RoncyWorks Green Team Profiles

In celebration of Garden Days 2018, the Roncesvalles Village BIA is showcasing the dedicated community members who maintain our sidewalk gardens and beautify our vibrant street.

Garden at 413 Roncesvalles

Karen Pivnick is volunteer gardener for Roncy Works and a resident of Roncesvalles Village for over 30 years. She maintains the garden bed at 413 Roncesvalles Ave, in front of the Westerly Bar and Village Meat deli. 

This is Karen’s second  season gardening with RoncyWorks. Karen joined RoncyWorks to combine “her love of gardening” with community involvement. She took over maintenance of the native plant garden planted by former RoncyWorks Green Team volunteer, Heidi Eisenhauer, after she moved away. What she finds most inspiring about gardening is watching her plants evolve and flourish, as well as seeing the joy her garden brings to people.

Karen Pivnick

Karen began gardening at a young age, experiencing the “creativity and work that was required” through her parents early on. As a homeowner, Karen has been “maintaining the plants on her property for over 30 years”.   

Despite her experience, being “a part of RoncyWorks and working with a dedicated group of gardeners” has allowed her to learn more about gardening from fellow community members. Furthermore, maintaining a street garden has given her a different perspective of the craft. “We can care for street gardens as you would a personal garden,” said Karen. “However, you need to manage expectations when a garden is in a public space. Selected plants must be able to survive wear and tear, worn soil and drought conditions.”

Garden Days on Roncy

While celebrating Garden Days 2018, the Roncesvalles Village BIA reflects on the importance of streetside gardens to our community and streetscape. Garden Days is Canada’s national celebration of gardening and its impact on communities across the country. Garden Days begins on Saturday June 16 and concludes on Sunday June 24.

RoncyWorks, the Dundas Roncesvalles Peace Garden, and the Roncesvalles Village BIA will be hosting a garden tour on Sunday June 24th from 1:00 to 3:00 pm starting at the Peace Garden, at the intersection of Dundas and Roncesvalles.

Garden at 233 Roncesvalles Avenue

The planting and maintenance of streetside  gardens is an ongoing collaboration between all three groups to create a colourful and scenic environment, and is supported by the Roncesvalles Village BIA.

Established in 2011, RoncyWorks is a community volunteer group made up of residents that aim to enhance the Roncesvalles Avenue streetscape.

The history of the existing sidewalk gardens on Roncesvalles Avenue dates back to 2009, when the Roncesvalles Village BIA set up the sub-committee named Roncesvalles Renewed to focus on potential enhancements for the street during the anticipated reconstruction. Composed of community members and the BIA’s Beautification Committee Chair, Roncesvalles Renewed consulted local groups, residents’ associations and key stakeholders. The group recommended the construction of garden beds, made design recommendations to City planners, and assisted in the planting of more than 100 diverse, native trees. In 2011,  the City of Toronto constructed 21 garden beds along Roncesvalles. The RVBIA assumed responsibility for their maintenance, and began the collaborations with volunteers to maintain the street’s garden beds, along with help from member businesses.

The Friends of Dundas Roncesvalles Peace Garden is a sister organization formed in 2009 to turn a barren jut of concrete at a busy intersection into a green, commemorative, community gathering place. Multiple community partners pressed forward the remarkable design and interesting features seen today. The Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation joined in to share history identifying the origin of this portion of Dundas Street as an Indigenous path, and local participation in the War of 1812. They worked together with the Peace Garden group on the City’s first cooperative community arts project with a Toronto youth group, which produced a set of 24 engraved pavers known as the Peace Path. It winds around the Garden. These projects are illustrated on a jointly sponsored plaque. At the entrance to the Peace Path is the City’s first utility box painting by an Indigenous artist, created to celebrate the opening of the Peace Garden in 2016. Each year Indigenous plantings, complete with story and celebration, are featured. This year, Chief Stacey Laforme and two local children planted sacred tobacco. Watch it grow, in a large circle on the eastern side of the Peace Garden.

Garden Days is about celebrating how gardening contributes to a cleaner environment and happier community, which is something the RVBIA has prioritized with their streetside gardens. The RVBIA, RoncyWorks and the Friends of DRPG volunteers have prioritized the planting of more pollinator, and sustainable perennial plants that can weather Toronto winters and regrow in the spring. Annual plants, typically colourful flowers, complement the perennials to create lush gardens bordering the street and sidewalk. We encourage you to take a walk down Roncesvalles to see or sit by the gardens, watch for a butterfly, and enjoy the close-to-nature ambiance of the street.

We will be producing a series of blog posts to celebrate our gardens and the extraordinary gardeners who volunteer their time to design and maintain them.

Mural Artists to Unveil Preliminary Design Elements at Roncy Rocks for Community Feedback

After two community consultations, the preliminary design elements for the new mural will be presented by artists Philip Cote and Jim Thierry Bravo at Roncy Rocks on June 9. at 1:30 pm. They  will be on hand to discuss their components with community members until 3:30 pm. The community consultation will take place at the site of the future mural oat Garden and Roncesvalles Avenue, next to Solarski Pharmacy. Roncy Rocks will serve as another opportunity for community members to participate in the mural envisioning process.

The mural project is being funded by the Roncesvalles Village BIA in partnership with the City of Toronto’s StreetARToronto program.

To learn more about the project, read our post  A New Mural for Roncesvalles Village.

More information on Rocky Rocks can be found on their website.

 

Mural Artists to Discuss Design Concepts with Community

As part of the StreetARToronto Parntership Program, the Roncesvalles Village BIA has commissioned two artists renowned for their public art, Philip Cote and Jim Thierry Bravo, to produce mural for Roncesvalles Village. The mural will be located at the intersection of Garden Ave and Roncesvalles Ave. 

Part of the process involves gathering feedback by the artists from the community. We’ve held an online survey to gather initial thoughts around the thematic framework. During the second stage of our consultation the community will be able to meet and speak with the artists on June 2nd from 1:30 to 3:00 pm. The third stage will include a survey and consultation to be held at Roncy Rocks on June 9th from 1:30 to 3:00 pm at the site of the new mural.

To learn more about the project, read our post  A New Mural for Roncesvalles Village.

To register for the community consultation to be held June 2, 2018 from 1:30 to 3:30 pm at the High Park Library, please register on our eventbrite page.

see and discuss the proposed concept, meet the artists during Roncy Rocks on Saturday June 9th, at Roncesvalles and Garden Avenue between 1:30 and 3:00 pm.

A New Mural for Roncesvalles Village

The Roncesvalles Village BIA has commissioned two artists renowned for their public art, Philip Cote and Jim Thierry Bravo, to design a mural for Roncesvalles Village. The project, funded by the City of Toronto’s StreetARToronto program and the Roncesvalles Village BIA, will add a contemporary piece to the murals on Roncesvalles Avenue for community members and visitors to enjoy.

The artists have begun to collaborate on the project and will produce a design that focuses on themes of Nature, Community and Stewardship in the area. To understand these themes, and how they are valued among Roncesvalles community members and visitors, the artists will gather thoughts and reflections through a SURVEY now available on the Roncesvalles website until May 28. They will present two to three design concepts to the Roncesvalles community on June 2 at the High Park Library and again at the Roncy Rocks Music and Arts Festival on June 9. After receiving final feedback about the design from the community, Cote and Bravo will begin producing the mural.

The work and thinking of Cote and Bravo reflect themes that RVBIA’s Street Advisory Committee believe are important to the Roncesvalles community. These themes include: Nature in the City, Urban Community, and the interconnected concepts of Legacy, Sustainability and Stewardship. According to RVBIA Chair, Len McAuley, it is important to reflect on the knowledge of Indigenous peoples when considering a theme such as legacy. “Many think “legacy” refers only to the man-made things that have survived from the past,” Chair McAuley explains. “But we should ask ourselves: what about the knowledge and wisdom that has been handed down from the Indigenous peoples as well as the settlers? What knowledge, values and resources can we pass on to support a sustainable future?”

Themes concerning sustainability and legacies can be challenging to depict in art. However, RVBIA board member, Adam Langley, believes that Cote and Bravo can achieve something compelling and thoughtful for the community. Langley explains that Cote’s “knowledge of Indigenous stewardship principles rooted in the Seven Fires Prophecy — which still has great significance to this time in our collective history” — will work well with Bravo’s “aptitude for capturing the spirit and dynamics of a community.”

As an Indigenous artist and graduate of OCAD University’s Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design, Cote uses his research and art to unearth and reveal his cultural experience and knowledge of signs of Indigenous symbols, language and interpretation. According to Cote, “The Seven Fires Prophecy of the Anishnaabe-Ojibwe people encourages the union of all peoples of the human race to ensure a kinship that will lead to peace and harmony.” Phil Cote lived on Roncesvalles Avenue for 3 years and remains involved in the community.

Jim Bravo majored in drawing and painting at OCAD University. Since completing his studies, Bravo has worked on over 30 public mural and many private large-scale commissions. Through local arts organizations, Bravo has also served as an arts mentor for several at-risk youth initiatives. Originally born in Ecuador, Bravo has lived in the Parkdale—High Park area for the last 30 years.

Philip Cote’s works and CV can be viewed online at: www.tecumsehcollective.wixsite.com/philipcote

Jim Thierry Bravo’s works and CV can be viewed online at:
www.JimBravopaintings.weebly.com

Community Survey

We invite community members to participate in the Roncesvalles Village mural project survey.